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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The 9mm and . 380 both have the same diameter bullet , but the 9mm casing and overall length is longer .   The .

.380 vs the 9mm [Battle Of The Nines]

.380 vs the 9mm [Battle Of The Nines]Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The 9mm and .380 both have the same diameter bullet , but the 9mm casing and overall length is longer .  The .380 has less recoil so is popular with concealable handguns while the 9mm is more powerful and has more recoil.  Both can be great defensive calibers if ammo is properly chosen. Some people love the 9mm, while others prefer something a bit bigger like the .45 ACP – or if your name’s Dirty Harry, you probably never leave home without your trusty .44 magnum. Go ahead, make my day. The .380 doesn’t get as much recognition as some of the other big name handgun calibers, mostly because it doesn’t have that hard-hitting reputation that the 9mm, 10mm, and .45 ACPs. Table of Contents Loading... A Little Bit on the .380 The .380 is an American-made cartridge that was created in 1908 by John Browning. .380 ACP Round It’s also referred to as the 9mm Browning, the 9x17mm, and the 9mm short, all due to the fact that it has the same diameter as the 9x19mm Parabellum that we all know and love. But in order to avoid confusion, I will not be referring to the .380 by any other name in this post. Popular Pistol Calibers The .380 was designed to be a low-recoil round that was easy to manage but strong enough to neutralize oncoming threats. Unfortunately, the .380 never lived up to its true potential as a service pistol and was overshadowed by the performance of the 9mm. Still, it did see some action among police forces, and was the caliber used by the MAC-11 submachine gun. The MAC-11 may be ugly but it’ll run through an entire 32-round mag in less than two seconds. Even though the .380 never lived up to the expectations that John Browning may have hoped for, it did become a popular backup pistol due to its relatively small size. And thanks to the gun’s low recoil, it has been marketed as a great self-defense cartridge for inexperienced shooters. Comparing the .380 to the 9mm With the exception of the train-stopping .45 ACP , which has a long history of success in the field, most other cartridges in production are going to have a hard time squaring off with the 9mm – and for good reason. 9mm (115gr vs 124gr vs 147 HP) The 9mm gives you the best of all worlds: magazine capacity, control, and power. It’s not hard to see why it’s not only the favored service pistol around the world, but also one of the most popular calibers time and time again. While the.380 might just look like the 9mm’s shorter cousin, but in actuality, these two rounds function quite differently. Keeping that in mind, it’s unfair to place the .380 up against the 9mm and ask which is better. Instead, what we should be asking is “which caliber is better for you? ” Various 9mm Glocks of difference sizes, courtesy of Lucky Gunner . Which Is More Powerful? When we’re looking at power, the 9mm unanimously beats the .380 every time. It’s a heavier cartridge that produces significantly more energy (including recoil energy) than the .380 ACP. If power is your primary focus and you’re thinking of going with a .380, you’re barking up the wrong tree. It’s been (unfairly) stereotyped as an underpowered cartridge for almost as long as it’s been around, and ballistic tests place the 9mm lightyears beyond the .380 with regards to power. And while it’s no match for the 9mm, shooting the right ammo can turn transform your .380 into a formidable concealed-carry pistol. Hornady 90-grain XTP Jacked Hollow Points are a well-rounded .380 round. If the .380 Is Underpowered, Why Would I Choose It over the 9mm? Well, if power is your primary decision, you wouldn’t. But power isn’t what the .380 is made for. In some ways, the low power of the .380 ACP is actually one of its strengths, depending on how you look at it . The average .380 gun is designed as an ultra-lightweight, subcompact handgun. This makes them great for use as a primary or backup concealed carry weapon, but not so great as a service pistol for police officers and military personnel. And since the .380 cartridge doesn’t produce much recoil energy, you’re able to exercise more control over your lightweight handgun than you would with a round like the 9mm. So, what you end up getting with the .380 is a lightweight gun that’s not much different in size to pocket pistols like the .22 LR, .25 ACP, and the .32 S&W, but is far more powerful. What about Shootability? Generally speaking, one of the biggest advantages to the 9mm is that it’s an easy-to-handle cartridge – at least when compared to the bigger calibers out there. Here’s a 9mm Glock 19: Indeed, the 9mm does have a lot to offer in terms of power and control, making it one of the most well-rounded handgun cartridges in my opinion. However, when we’re looking at shootability between the 9mm and the .380, the 9mm loses this round. If you’re looking for a powerful caliber that’s easy to handle, the .380 delivers in every way. Here’s a Bersa Firestorm .380: It may not have the same expansion or penetration as the 9mm, but it does have lower recoil. In fact, if you shoot from a 9mm handgun and a .380 handgun that weigh the same, the .380 will have 94% less recoil than the 9mm. While that low recoil will probably do you little good if you’re trying to protect yourself from someone on the other side of the parking lot, it would make a difference if you’re stopping an armed assailant who’s entering your bedroom – especially if you’re an inexperienced shooter. Which Is the Better Concealed Carry Pistol? Again, that depends a lot on the needs and expectations you have of your pistol. Remember, the 9mm is the superior caliber for military and police because it’s powerful, easy to control, has a maximum effective range of 50 meters (almost 55 yards). It also has a maximum range of 1,800 meters, but good luck at hitting a target that far away unless you’re shooting legend, Jerry Miculek. Needless to say, the .380 doesn’t outdo the 9mm on any of those strengths, with the exception of being easier to control. But stopping threats 50-yards away isn’t what the .380 is designed for. It’s a mouse gun that’s meant as a last resort to neutralize threats at close range. For this reason, it’s become a popular handbag pistol for female shooters and it also makes a great backup pistol for law enforcement officers. The Verdict I mean, can you really go wrong with a 9mm? The type of person who thinks the 9mm is overrated is probably going to be using the .45 ACP or the .357 Mag if they like to mix it up. Personally, I believe that the 9mm is an all-around great round that’s useful in damn near every type of scenario, whereas the .380 is limited to close-range protection. Like the Ruger LCP II pictured, most .380s are extremely compact. Also, for all of you doomsday preppers looking for the best survival round, the 9mm clearly wins that one as well due to the fact that you’re more likely to come across 9mm ammo than other cartridges. If I was shopping around for my very first handgun, I’d go with the 9mm every day of the week simply because you can get more out of it. But if you’ve already got a 9mm or another big boy caliber and you’re looking for a new gun that’s lightweight and easy to carry around, the .380 makes a fine addition to your collection. Remember, the .380 isn’t an ineffective round by stretch of the imagination. It just doesn’t outperform the 9mm in any way except for weight and size. And since subcompact 9mms are a thing , there’s no reasons why you’d have to make the .380 your primary concealed carry gun unless you really wanted to. At the end of the day, part of buying a gun is finding the right fit for you. Now that you’ve learned a little bit about the 9mm and the .380, you should hit the shooting range and give both calibers a test to see which one you like best. As always, be sure to let us know what you think about the .380 vs the 9mm. Are you a big-gun slinger, a compact 9mm shooter, or do you prefer the .380 pocket pistols?  If you are a fan of mouse guns and would like to add a new .380 to your collection, or your pocket, take a look at our top five concealed carry .380 pistols for more information. Also, if you’re just getting into guns and came across this page while researching for your first gun purchase, make sure to check out our in-depth write-up on home defense handguns for beginners . As you’ll see, it’s mostly a 9mm fest for the reasons I’ve mentioned above (versatility and power).

Behind the Bullet: 10mm Auto

Behind the Bullet: 10mm Auto

by Philip Massaro We are all familiar with U.S. Marine Col. John D. “Jeff” Cooper, his passion for defensive firearms training, and his love for the M1911 in .45ACP. He was the founder of the American Pistol Institute —you may know it by its modern name: Gunsite Academy . At API Col. Cooper taught the skills necessary to defend one’s self, and instilled the appropriate mindset for that defense. Invariably, the good Colonel preferred the .45ACP as the tool for that job. However, as good as the venerable Browning-designed cartridge was, is and shall be, Col. Cooper had a desire for a faster, harder hitting defensive cartridge. In the early 1980s, Col. Cooper sat at the drawing board to develop a cartridge of suitable diameter, which would drive a 200-grain bullet to a muzzle velocity of 1,200 fps, in deference to the .45ACPs heavy bullet concept, but with a bit more horsepower. What he ended up with—with the help of Whit Collins, John Adams and Irving Stone—would morph into the 10mm Automatic. Released in 1983 in the BrenTen handgun, the 10mm Automatic offered and improvement on the exterior and terminal ballistics of the 9mm Luger and .45ACP. Using a cut off .30 Remington case (a cartridge with .30/30 WCF ballistics, but of different conformation), measuring 0.992” long, the straight-walled design would function like the Luger and .45ACP in that it would headspace off the case mouth, and it would use the .38-40’s .400” diameter bullets. Fast forward three years, in Miami, Florida. Two bank robbers, William Russell Matix and Michael Lee Platt were in a shootout with eight FBI agents, and despite being outnumbered, they were winning. Using a 12-gauge shotgun, a .357 revolver and a Ruger Mini-14 rifle, the robbers had held off the FBI for over five minutes, killing two agents, and subsequently dying for their efforts. A long investigation followed, and the FBI laid a portion of the blame for the fiasco on the 9mm Luger and .38 Special sidearms that the agents were carrying. The Bureau determined that these calibers had exhibited a lack of stopping power, and the hunt was on to arm FBI agents with a semi-automatic pistol (the difficulty of reloading a revolver in a fire fight was an issue in this case as well) of suitable caliber to stop an armed opponent, at distances greater than the .45 ACP could. The FBI ordered 10,000 Smith & Wesson Model 1076 pistols , with a 4¼” barrel chambered in 10mm Auto, for issuance to their agents, but the order was cancelled when the recoil of the Big 10 proved to be too much for some agents to handle effectively. The ammunition was down-loaded, leaving a substantial airspace, and while the terminal ballistics of the lighter load was acceptable to the FBI, Smith & Wesson decided to shorten the case, resulting in the .40 S&W we all know so well. And, it seemed as though the 10mm would be headed for obscurity. In spite of being forced to take a serious back seat to the .40 Smith & Wesson (which many 10mm devotees refer as the .40 Short & Weak), and the fact that very few modern pistols are being chambered for the 10mm Auto, it has made a bit of a comeback as a hunting round. Guys like Ted Nugent and Razor Dobbs have championed the 10, taking game up to the size of elk with it, and singing the praises of the cartridge in the hunting fields. It approaches the power of the .41 Rem. Mag., but in an autoloader. Federal , Remington , Winchester , Hornady and other boutique companies make 10mm Auto ammunition, loaded with good bullets that are suitable for both hunting and for self-defense as well. Federal Premium’s Trophy Bonded 180-grain bullet at 1,275 fps would make for an excellent deer or hog, as would the Hornady 180-grain XTP at 1,180 fps. It’s obvious that distances will be on the shorter side of life, due to the limitations of barrel length and sighting radius, so with the higher impact velocities you’ll want a stout bullet to guarantee good penetration. DoubleTap and Buffalo Bore offer heavy-for-caliber hard cast lead bullets, at 220 and 230 grains moving along at just about 1,100 fps. If you like the way a full-sized frame shoots, but want a bit more power than the .45 ACP has to offer, wrap your hands around the Big 10, and you may find the handgun experience you’ve been looking for. Read more at americanhunter.org Photos courtesy of americanhunter.org Featured image courtesy of SIG SAUER Elite Performance Ammunition

The Ultimate Guide to Finding the Best Muzzleloader Rifles

The Ultimate Guide to Finding the Best Muzzleloader Rifles

Owning a muzzleloader can be an incredibly rewarding experience. Not only are they tons of fun to shoot, but for hunters, having a muzzleloader also gives you the advantage of being able to hunt in your state’s special muzzleloader or primitive-weapons season. Still, if you’re unfamiliar with this type of firearm, you’ll probably find that the majority of today’s modern muzzleloaders and black-powder rifles aren’t quite what you’re expecting. These firearms have come a long way over the years, with many of them having very little in common with those used by famous American pioneersmen. Although original muzzleloaders were often limited to a maximum range of 200 yards at best, you can now find a range of different muzzleloading rifles that can easily allow you to take down targets at 500 yards or more. Nonetheless, if you prefer the idea of something more traditional, you can also find a number of flintlock-style rifles. Unfortunately, the wide range of different styles means finding the best muzzleloader is anything but simple. Tips for Buying the Best Muzzleloader Due to the wide range of different calibers, styles and sizes, you’ll need to put some careful thought into your purchase in order to get a muzzleloader that matches your needs. This is especially important if you plan on using the muzzleloader for hunting, as most states have some specific requirements during muzzleloading season. Some states like Pennsylvania have specially strict regulations, meaning its important to first consult your local hunting regulations in order to ensure that your chosen firearm is legal to use in your state. Of course, this really only applies if you plan on using it during the special muzzleloader season . Otherwise, should you plan on using it during the normal rifle season, you’re free to choose whichever firearm you wish. Due to the growing power and accuracy of today’s modern muzzloaders, more and more hunters are choosing to go this route due to the increased challenges hunting with a muzzleloader provides. Inline or Traditional Sidelock​ Although the majority of modern muzzleloaders are of the inline variety, you can still find a number of more traditional sidelock-style rifles. This style generally doesn’t offer quite the same level of performance as the best inline muzzleloader and isn’t suitable for use with scopes or blackpowder substitutes, but they do offer a much more traditional look and feel. As well, the regulations in some states prohibit the use of anything but a sidelock muzzleloader during the primitive weapons season, meaning they just might be your only choice depending on where you live/ plan on hunting. Caliber​ Caliber is another important factor, both in terms of local regulations and what type of game you plan on hunting. Generally speaking, your best bet is .50-cal, both for improved versatility and power. Still, you can also find a range of .45-cal muzzleloaders that should be fine for deer-sized game. As well, you may be able to find even more powerful models, but most states prohibit hunting with anything higher than .50-cal. Barrel Style​ You can also find a number of different barrel styles and materials. We generally recommend you go with a stainless steel barrel as they are much easier to clean and maintain. The twist rate of the barrel is also important, depending on what type of projectiles you plan on shooting. The best muzzleloader bullets for hunting are usually conical-shaped projectiles, which require a twist rate of 1:24 to 1:28 in order to fire most effectively. As well, there’s also a Savage muzzleloader that allows you to use smokeless black powder, although its production was discontinued in 2013 due to poor sales. Although using smokeless powder helps ensure your gun stays cleaner longer, there have been numerous reports of these weapons exploding and at least one lawsuit has been filed against the company. For this reason, you’d definitely be better off choosing one of these other firearms instead. What are the Best Muzzleloaders? In no particular order, here are 4 of the finest muzzleloaders money can buy: Remington Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader The gold-standard in modern muzzleloaders, the Remington Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader easily outperforms every other muzzleloading rifle on the market. In fact, it is so advanced that it even outperforms some centerfire rifles. Unfortunately, this means that the majority of states prohibit its use during muzzleloader season. One of the reasons that this muzzleloader is so good is its unique ignition system. Whereas all other muzzleloaders use either a musket cap or primer, the Model 700 uses a centerfire rifle casing that results in a more powerful, hotter ignition. This allows this rifle to safely and efficiently burn up to 200 grains of powder, compared to a maximum of 150 grains in any other muzzleloader. The overall quality and design of the Model 700 makes it by far the best muzzleloader on the market and a fantastic choice for anyone who wishes to use a blackpowder rifle during their state’s standard deer season. CVA Optima The best-selling muzzleloader for much of the past decade, the CVA Optima is an excellent choice for its combination of accuracy, reliable performance and price. Considered by many to be the best muzzleloader for the money, the Optima is actually CVA’s mid-level model. However, the lower-priced CVA Wolf suffers from a few inherent design flaws that makes it not really worth the money. On the other hand, the Optima offers excellent performance and is super easy to use, making it a great choice for beginners and expert blackpowder marksmen. Thompson-Center Encore Pro Hunter FX Another one of the leading muzzleloader producers, Thompson-Center produces an outstanding range of blackpowder rifles, but the Encore Pro Hunter FX is easily amongst the best. Designed to withstand weather and corrosion due to its unique weather-shield coating, this rifle also helps to minimize recoil with its specially designed FlexTech stock. It’s also ambidextrous and easy to clean due to the easy-to-remove breech plug. Generally speaking, if you’re looking for a truly outstanding muzzleloader and your state doesn’t allow the use of the Remington Model 700, then the Encore Pro Hunter FX is probably your next best bet. Lyman Great Plains Rifle Although it may not be able to compare to any of the other muzzleloaders on our list in terms of performance, accuracy or distance, the Lyman Great Plains Rifle is the go-to choice for anyone looking for a traditional blackpowder experience and is available in your choice of percussion cap or flintlock. Should your state regulations leave you limited in terms of firearm options, the Lyman "Great Plains Rifle" is without a doubt one of your best choices. On the other hand, if you can find an older Thompson-Center Hawken muzzleloader, it’s also an outstanding choice as far as traditional muzzeloaders go. Sure, it may weigh quite a bit and its definitely not the cheapest, but the overall appearance and novelty factor of this firearm make it well worth the hassle. History of Muzzleloaders To show you just how far today’s modern muzzleloaders have come, we thought it would be interesting to provide you with a brief historical overview. Basically, the only thing that modern muzzleloaders have with their historical counterparts is that you still have to load the gunpowder and projectile by hand through the muzzle—hence their name. Still, it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to learn that muzzleloaders have undergone many design improvements over the years, considering the fact that they were originally developed in the early 17 th century. In fact, the very first flintlock was created for French King Louis XVIII in 1610. In the 1700s, the version of the long rifle known as the Pennsylvania Rifle or Kentucky Rifle began to gain in popularity with American settlers. Featuring a rifled-barrel, this rifle offered improved accuracy and greater distance than previous flintlock rifles. This style of muzzleloader is easily one of the most iconic, mainly due to its use in the American Revolution. Another improvement then came in 1807, when a Scottish reverend by the name of Alexander Forsyth patented his invention of the first percussion-cap rifle. This invention allowed for improved firing times and helped to prevent issues with misfires due to wet gunpowder. The percussion-cap design then allowed Jean Samuel Pauley to invent the first inline muzzleloader the following year in 1808. However, this inline muzzleloader has very little to do with modern inline muzzleloaders, which tend to use a rifle or shotgun primer instead of a percussion cap. From this point on, muzzleloading technology basically stayed the same until the 1980s, when Thompson-Center and Knight introduced pioneering new versions of the this traditional rifle. In this sense, Thompson-Center was especially important, as its original Encore muzzleloader incorporated a 209-shotgun primer to produce an even more powerful and accurate firearm. Outfitting Your Muzzleloader with a Scope Due to the increased range of modern muzzleloaders, many hunters are choosing to outfit their blackpowder rifles with a scope in order to take better advantage of this range. The majority of today’s inline muzzleloaders are compatible with scopes, and by choosing a top-quality one, you can help ensure improved accuracy at greater distance. If this sounds like something you’re interested in, you should definitely check out our guide to choosing the best muzzleloader scope . A Note about Muzzleloader Powder Generally speaking, the majority of muzzleloader shooters still tend to use traditional black powder. However, some of the more modern firearms are also compatible with various synthetic powder substitutes like Clean Shot, Triple-Seven or Pyrodex. Still, its important to check with your local gunsmith or read your owner’s manual to ensure that this is true of your rifle. These synthetic powders generally provide a number of advantages over traditional black powder, mainly in that they usually ignite hotter or produce less smoke. On the other hand, it’s important to ensure that you never attempt to use smokeless powder in any muzzleloading rifle, as these can potentially cause your rifle to explode. Unfortunately, judging by the case of the aforementioned Savage muzzleloader, this seems to be true even in firearms supposedly designed for this purpose. When using a synthetic powder substitute, you’ll need to be aware of the fact that these may be harder to ignite. As well, the loading instructions may be slightly different for these powders, so its always a good idea to consult a professional before attempting to use them the first time. The Pros and Cons of Hunting with a Muzzleloader For most people who choose to hunt with a muzzleloader, the main draws are the increased challenge and more traditional hunting experience. There’s nothing like setting out with your blackpowder rifle and testing your skills one-on-one against a deer the way people used to do for hundreds of years. However, the limitations in terms of distance and accuracy means that you’ll need to ensure you get closer to your target than you would need with a standard centerfire rifle. As well, you’ll also need to make sure you put in plenty of time at the range before heading out into the field. The limitations in terms of reloading speed means its quite likely that you’ll only be able to get off one shot before the animal spooks, so you’ll need to make sure that that one shot counts. While the increased challenge is definitely a major factor in many people’s choice to purchase a muzzleloader, there are also just as many hunters who do so simply for the fact that it allows them to hunt during the primitive weapons season. Depending on where you live, this season can take place either before or after the standard rifle season. As well, some states actually have separate seasons for all muzzleloaders and flintlock-style rifles only. At the end of the day, you really can’t go wrong with a more traditional muzzleloader or one of today’s many modern variants. As long as you make sure to put a bit of time and effort into your choice, you’ll definitely find that hunting with the best muzzleloader is an absolute blast (no pun intended). Contents Tips for Buying the Best Muzzleloader Inline or Traditional Sidelock​ Caliber​ Barrel Style​ What are the Best Muzzleloaders? Remington Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader CVA Optima Thompson-Center Encore Pro Hunter FX Lyman Great Plains Rifle History of Muzzleloaders "Outfitting Your Muzzleloader" with a Scope A Note about Muzzleloader Powder The Pros and Cons of Hunting with a Muzzleloader

Building a Basic Defensive Arsenal

Building a Basic Defensive Arsenal

Times are tough. The economy is rolling, but not like a freight train. The country is in heavy debt from social spending and the support of conflicts abroad that are not really our conflicts. The middle class is taxed to death. The oil industry is still dragging. Ironically, we continue to import oil from the Saudis just as we discover a huge new oil field in Texas . Families struggle to support themselves with two or more jobs. Medical care costs are out the roof and insurance is crazy expensive. The post-election turmoil continues. Who knows how that will turn out? With all this going on, how can any person, family or team interested in prepping afford to supply themselves with essentials much less build a decent protective weapons cache? It can be done. It has to be done with consideration for a bare bones approach. Here are some suggestions to formulate a plan if you are just getting started. Quick Navigation Begin with the Basics Handgun of Choice Smoothbores Prepper Rifles Begin with the Basics A good Ford F-150 or Chevy pickup will get you to work, and to bug out camp just as well as a $100,000 Land Rover. Actually, the pickup is probably the better choice anyway. It is the same concept in putting together a starter kit for personal protection prepping weapons. You don’t need the top bill guns to start out. What you need to do is shop smart and buy wisely.  With all kinds of debates on this topic, everybody has their own thoughts and opinions on what to get. The bottom barrel scratch kit should include a basic defense handgun, a good pump shotgun, and a defensive rifle. Again, this is not a wish list, but a base set of guns to get the job done. Handgun of Choice In the realm of handheld weapons there are base choices: a 5-6 shot swing out cylinder, double action revolver, or a magazine fed semi-auto pistol. The choices for a newbie are overwhelming. If you are so new to this game that you know virtually nothing about guns, then do your homework. There are plenty of resources: shop a good prepper gun book, the internet,  and seek out advice from firearms professionals. Related: Best Handgun Calibers for Survival Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA As for revolvers, I suggest you find a good .357 Magnum, six shot, 4-6 inch, double action. With this handgun you can also shoot less recoiling .38 Specials in the same gun. There are two bonus features to that. Learn to shoot with less powerful loads that are cheaper to shoot, then have the full power .357 when needed. If these revolvers are too large to be comfortable for your grip, then opt for a smaller .38 Special with a four or six inch barrel. This is a protective wheel gun, not a concealment firearm. Go with fixed sights such or quality adjustable sights.  If you want to tackle the more complicated semi-auto pistol that is magazine fed through the base of the grip, I highly recommend the 9mm. This is a widely available, mid-range power pistol cartridge. I also recommend professional insurance and shooting instruction from USCCA . Pistols have various safety mechanisms and other factors that demand instruction. Reading the owner’s manual is not enough. There are dozens of choices for this type of pistol on the market. Choose a high quality pistol brand such as a Beretta, Glock, Colt, Smith and Wesson , Ruger, SCCY, SIG, or CZ. Handle as many full-sized pistols as you can. Steer away from the pocket pistol for an initial handgun. Handgun costs vary widely for new and used guns. Revolvers can be found from $300 to $1000. Pistols are the same pricing from $400 on the low end to $1000. If you shop carefully, I think you can find a good pistol for $500 or less. Add a couple extra factory magazines and at least 500 rounds of ammo. Smoothbores Let’s go simple here. Buy a pump action, 12-gauge shotgun. The 26-inch barrel is good, but some can handle an 18-20 inch barrel. Get screw in chokes so you can hunt with the gun. Choose either plain hardwood or black synthetic stocks . These shotguns will only have a bead sight up front to align when looking down the barrel. I am biased toward the Remington 870, but other brands are available. In regards to bird hunting, buy several boxes of hunting shells with shot load sizes in #6, 7 ½, and 8. For defense, get some loads in buckshot or high brass #2s or 4s. Add a box or two of shotgun slugs for heavy hunting or heavy threats. A good used 870 can be bought for $150-250. A brand new one can be had for $289 at Academy or other outlets. Buy the base model with matte finish and wood stock at this price. Prepper Rifles There is plenty of content available on prepper rifles. Treat this purchase as mentioned above for handguns. Again, let’s cut to the chase. If you could only have one defensive prep rifle to start with, then it needs to be a basic AR-15, 5.56 Nato/.223. There are dozens of options to buy. See Also: The Katrina Rifle The basic AR that offers the most versatility is an “optics ready” version or a model with a flat top Picatinny rail for mounting open sights or an optical scope . The hand guard should offer an accessory mounting system, Picatinny rail, M-Loc, or KeyMod arrangement so you can add sling mounts, flashlight, or handstops as needed.  Don’t go wild with accessories on a first, primary rifle. Learn to handle it, shoot it, maintain it and carry it. Accessorize it later. A good AR should cost no more than $800. At present there are nearly 500 AR rifle makers. Stick with a well-known, common factory rifle. Buy a manual on its upkeep, running, and maintenance. For basics, add at least 10 high quality polymer magazines. Build your ammo stock up to a minimum of 1000 rounds. Add some practice, hunting, and defensive rounds. Load all your mags and mark them accordingly. This is your basic piecemeal prepper gun kit . At the very least, this is a good place to start: one handgun, shotgun, and a rifle. The options are many. Wade into the swamp as soon as possible, get instruction, and practice. Advance your strategic and tactical skills with time. Soon you’ll be ready. Photos Courtesy of: John Woods Diane Webb Stokes-Snapshots Save Save Other interesting articles: Prepper Guns on a Budget "Best Handgun Calibers" For Survival Survival Gear Review: 1887 T-Model 12 Gauge Shotgun The Ubiquitous 30-30 Lever Gun

Moms Need Self Defense

It is an ugly thing to consider, but there are men who violently attack mothers. Through nothing more than natural physiology, women are disadvantaged in stature and muscularity to men. Mothers also have an added risk because of their need and responsibility to protect their children. Those without self defense training and tools are even more susceptible to attack from the types who would prey on that vulnerability. In a self-defense situation, we revert to our instincts (and lowest level of proficiency acquired through training, but I’ll get to that in a minute). Some call the reaction to the stress of a life-threatening event the “fight or flight response.” However, there is a third option hardwired into people’s basic natures: fight, flight, or freeze. Without any training or preparation for how to respond under duress, complex decision making ability evaporates and the individual’s innate character will determine whether they haul butt as far as possible from the danger, whether they charge their attacker back in their own defense, or whether they become mentally paralyzed, without a clear idea of how to respond. I have two different examples of unarmed, and untrained mothers who found themselves in mortal danger in front of their children and how they responded. Disclaimer: The video linked in the first story is graphic and may not be suitable for younger audiences. This week, a young mother of two in New Jersey was watching television with her three year old daughter in the afternoon as her 18 month old son napped upstairs when a large black man kicked his way into her house and immediately began viciously beating the mother as she lay on the couch with her daughter crying beside her. Throughout the video captured on the home nanny cam , the violent burglar can be seen walking in and out of the living room. Each time he returns, he resumes attacking the mother. The woman does nothing in her defense, not even after being kicked in the face and thrown down a set of stairs. Miraculously, she survived the beatings with only a concussion and needing several stitches in her mouth and the large intruder made off with some of her jewelry, including her wedding ring. In her explanation of the events, the woman (who chose to remain anonymous for the interview) felt her best chance of surviving was to do nothing, for fear that if she started crying and screaming that it would upset her daughter and draw the attacker’s attention to her. A Texan mother, attacked last week by a carjacker after purchasing groceries with her two young sons (two and five years old), had a different response. In Dorothy Baker’s situation, a man who had hidden in the back seat of her unlocked vehicle climbed up behind the driver’s seat, placed a knife to the woman’s throat, and told her to follow his instructions if she didn’t want any harm to come to her sons. He told her to drive up to an ATM to withdraw money. Baker refused, and he responded with violence, cutting her across her chest. She struggled with him, grabbing the knife away, and he bit her hand. She intentionally drove into a telephone pole, in the hopes of sending her assailant through the windshield (as he was the only vehicle occupant without a seatbelt) and away from her children. She also hit him in the face and told him to get out of the car. The man ended his attack, and fled from the minivan. To stop him from harming anyone else, Baker backed up her vehicle and struck him with it. She explained her actions in the encounter saying that all she could think of was that she had to do something get the man away from her children so that he wouldn’t harm them. Both mothers had the goal of protecting their children, and each responded according to their own natural instincts. In this case, the New Jersey mom froze, and the Texan mom fought. After the incident, the family in the invaded New Jersey home had a security system installed. However, getting self defense training and [home or concealed] carry can also be significant weapons in one’s self defense arsenal, and could have helped in the case of home invasion in NJ as well as the carjacking in TX. Having self defense tools, such as firearms, knives , tasers, or pepper spray , is a start, but training to use them proficiently is equally important. In the kind of situation where one’s life, and the safety of their children, is on the line, people will fall back to their lowest level of proficiency and their instinct. It is certainly possible to survive self defense situations without training – people, like the mothers in these stories, do it everyday – but one’s odds of survival are greatly improved when they have tools for that end, and know how to use them. Being able to defend one’s self is important, but what would you do to protect your kids?

The 4 Best Smith & Wesson M&P 40 Accessories – Reviews 2020 Photo by James Case / CC BY The M&P series of firearms are immensely popular. They are carried across the country with law enforcement and concealed carriers. The M&P 40 is a powerful, easy to shoot, and accurate weapon. Out of the box, it is almost perfect, but, there are some slight improvement you can make. When you start accessorizing the M&P40, you need to choose items that keep the weight down, but add additional functionality to the weapon. Improvements to the M&P 40 are few, but we’ve found four of the best M&P 40 accessories on the market. Meprolight Tru-Dot Night Sights Meprolight Smith & Wesson Tru-Dot Night Sight for M&P 9/40 & 9C/40 full size & compact. Fixed set Price: $89.00 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:08 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The S&W M&P 40 comes with a decent pair of sights, they are certainly functional, and they can get you on target. However, they are quite spartan. They are for use during the day and are weak at night. A good set of night sights improves the weapon’s versatility, and when and where it can be effectively used. The Tru-Dot Night sights are a favorite for military and law enforcement. They glow intensely at night and are extremely easy to pick up in dim or low light situations. The Meprolight night sights ( see full specs ) are perfect for home defense scenarios so when something goes bump in the night, you can bump back. Their uses aren’t limited to just night time uses, however. Buildings can often be much dimmer than the light outside. Imagine being in a movie theater and having to rely on day sights only. A good set of night sights can go far for you. The Tru-Dot night sights are perfect for the M&P and specifically fitted for them. Installation is very simple, and can be done at home. If you’re unsure of how to, a gunsmith will be happy to help. The Meprolight sights are some of the brightest in the world, and they last 15 years before they begin dimming. Meprolight night sights work well during the day, and easy to engage with regardless of the light conditions. They’re easily among the best S&W M&P 40 accessories you can buy. MEPROLIGHT TRU DOT NIGHT SIGHTS FOR GLOCK - REVIEW Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The 9mm and . 380 both have the same diameter bullet , but the 9mm casing and overall length is longer .   The .